Latest Nordic Walking Research

Nordic Walking Training Causes a Decrease in Blood Cholesterol in Elderly Women Supplemented with Vitamin D

Objective: Different studies have demonstrated that regular exercise can induce changes in the lipid profile, but results remain inconclusive. Available data suggest that correction of vitamin D deficiency can improve the lipid profile. In this study, we have hypothesized that Nordic Walking training will improve lipid profile in elderly women supplemented with vitamin D.

Methods: A total of 109 elderly women (68 ± 5.12 years old) took part in the study. First group [experimental group (EG): 35 women] underwent 12 weeks of Nordic Walking (NW) training combined with vitamin D supplementation (4,000 IU/day), second group [supplementation group (SG): 48 women] was only supplemented with vitamin D (4,000 IU/day), and third group [control group (CG): 31 women] was not subject to any interventions. Blood analysis of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and 25-OH-D3 was performed at baseline and after the 12 weeks of NW training.

Additionally ...   read more 


Source: 

  • February 2018
  • Frontiers in Endocrinology 9

 

    • DOI
    • 10.3389/fendo.2018.00042
 

 

Nordic walking training on sarcopenia-related parameters in women with low bone mass

Background

Several studies have demonstrated the positive effects of physical activity on skeletal muscle mass and muscle strength in women with osteoporosis. However, the impact of Nordic walking training on sarcopenia-related parameters in women with low bone mass remains unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of 12 weeks of Nordic walking training on skeletal muscle index, muscle strength, functional mobility, and functional performance in women with low bone mass.

Materials and methods

The participants were 45 women, aged 63–79 years, with osteopenia or osteoporosis. The subjects were randomly assigned either to an experimental group (12 weeks of Nordic walking training, three times a week) or to a control group. Skeletal muscle mass and other body composition factors were measured with octapolar bioimpedance InBody 720 analyser. Knee extensor and flexor isometric muscle strength were measured using Biodex System 4 Pro™ dynamometers. This study also used a SAEHAN Digital Hand Dynamometer to measure handgrip muscle strength. The timed up-and-go test was used to measure functional mobility, and the 6-minute walk test was used to measure functional performance.

Results

Short-term Nordic walking training induced a significant increase in skeletal muscle mass (P=0.007), skeletal muscle index (P=0.007), strength index of the knee extensor (P=0.016), flexor (P<0.001), functional mobility (P<0.001), and functional performance (P<0.001) and a significant decrease in body mass (P=0<006), body mass index (P<0.001), and percent body fat (P<0.001) in participants. Regarding handgrip muscle strength, no improvement was registered (P=0.315). No significant changes in any of the analyzed parameters were observed in the control group.

Conclusion

Overall, short-term Nordic walking training induces positive changes in knee muscle strength and functional performance in women with low bone mass. This finding could be applied in clinical practice for intervention programs in women with osteopenia and osteoporosis.


Effects of short-term Nordic walking training on sarcopenia-related parameters in women with low bone mass: a preliminary study

Several studies have demonstrated the positive effects of physical activity on skeletal muscle mass and muscle strength in women with osteoporosis. However, the impact of Nordic walking training on sarcopenia-related parameters in women with low bone mass remains unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of 12 weeks of Nordic walking training on skeletal muscle index, muscle strength, functional mobility, and functional performance in women with low bone mass.

The participants were 45 women, aged 63–79 years, with osteopenia or osteoporosis. The subjects were randomly assigned either to an experimental group (12 weeks of Nordic walking training, three times a week) or to a control group. ...

Read more ...


Source: Dovepress:Clinical Interventions in Aging

 

Effects of Nordic Walking and Pilates exercise programs on blood glucose and lipid profile in overweight and obese postmenopausal women

During menopause, defined as the cessation of menstrual bleeding, numerous metabolic changes take place. The postmenopausal period is characterized by, for instance, a drop in the levels of estradiol and highdensity lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and an increase in body weight (often with fat accumulating in the stomach area) and an increase in the concentrations of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol or very-low-density lipoprotein and triglycerides (TG). The postmenopausal period is also diabetogenic, manifesting as decreased glucose tolerance.

Each of these elements contributes to atherosclerotic processes and is a component of a potentially life-threatening or health-threatening disorder called the metabolic syndrome. Thus, intervention
is necessary ...

Read more ...


Source: The Journal of The North American Menopause Society; Vol. 22, No. 11, pp. 1215-1223

Exploring Muscle Activation during Nordic Walking: A Comparison between Conventional and Uphill Walking

Abstract

Nordic Walking (NW) owes much of its popularity to the benefits of greater energy expenditure and upper body engagement than found in conventional walking (W). Muscle activation during NW is still understudied, however. The aim of the present study was to assess differences in muscle activation and physiological responses between NW andWin level and uphill walking conditions. Nine expert Nordic Walkers (mean age 36.8±11.9 years; BMI 24.2 ±1.8 kg/m2) performed 5-minute treadmill trials ofWand NW at 4 km/h on inclines of 0% and 15%.

The electromyographic activity of seven upper body and five leg muscles and oxygen consumption (VO2) were recorded and pole force during NW was measured. VO2 during NW was 22.3% higher at 0% and only 6.9% higher at 15% than during W, while upper body muscle activation was 2- to 15-fold higher under both conditions. Lower body muscle activation was similarly increased during NW andWin the uphill condition, whereas the increase in erector spinae muscle activity was lower during NW than W.

Read more ...


Source: PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0138906 September 29, 2015

  • «
  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1 
  •  2 
  •  3 
  •  4 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
  • »
Page 1 of 4